Skip to content

SSI work incentives

Work incentive employment supports help Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients go to work by minimizing the risk of losing their SSI or Medicaid benefits. Find SSI work incentives based on a person's needs.

See SSI work incentives that help a person:

  • 1619(b). Keep MA coverage with earnings up to $66,319 per year (or possibly higher based on medical expenses).
  • MA-EPD. MA coverage for Minnesotans with disabilities who work, pay Medicare and Social Security taxes, and earn more than $65 per month.
  • 1619(b). Keep SSI eligibility even when earnings cause SSI to be $0 if other SSI eligibility criteria are still met and earnings are less than $66,319 per year (or possibly higher based on medical expenses).
  • Expedited Reinstatement of Benefits. Get benefits back quickly if earnings are above $66,319 for more than 1 year and SSI terminates. If earnings fall below Substantial Gainful Activity ($1,350 in 2022), automatically get six months of benefits while waiting for a disability determination. This program works for 60 months after SSI terminates due to work.
  • Earned or General Income Exclusion. The first $20 of any income and the first $65 of earned income each month isn't counted when determining SSI amount.
  • Student Earned Income Exclusion. The first $2,040 per month of earnings (up to $8,230 per year) isn't counted when determining SSI amount.
  • Blind Work Expenses. Earned income used on work expenses isn't counted when determining SSI amount.
  • Plan for Achieving Self Support. SSI is increased if the money is used to pay for education, work or self-employment costs.
  • Impairment-Related Work Expenses. Income used to pay for certain disability-related work expenses isn't counted when determining SSI amount.
  • Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Account. The money in an ABLE account (up to $100,000) isn't counted when determining SSI eligibility or amount.
  • Individual Development Account (IDA). Money in an IDA account isn't counted when determining SSI eligibility, and up to half of the amount put in the IDA account isn't counted when determining SSI amount.
  • Property Essential to Self-Support. Things used to make money in self-employment aren't counted as resources for SSI.
  • Plan for Achieving Self Support. SSI is increased if the money is used to pay for education, work or self-employment costs.
  • Student Earned Income Exclusion. The first $2,040 per month of earnings (up to $8,230 per year) isn't counted when determining SSI amount.
  • Ticket to Work. Services and supports to help people go to work.